Here you will find some of our larger garden pieces. We offer some classic pieces, Easter Island, giant gargoyles, a giant Inuksuk, Buddha and some very unique garden focal point pieces (the Romanesque Folly, the Four Elements – Water and Nature’s Infant for example).

Statuary can be left outside year-round.

Showing 1–24 of 43 results

Akahanga, stained concrete Easter Island statue for outdoor garden or patio

Akahanga

Located over 2700 miles off the coast of Chile, the isolated Easter Island boasts the world’s largest collection of megaliths.  These giant statues range in height from 10 – 33 feet and were constructed over 18 centuries ago.  All of the statues face westward and their significance is still a subject of debate.  Some say they represent lost kings, and that one was constructed for every king.  Others say they are to scare away invaders.  The real mystery is how they were transported to where they now stand.  Weighing as much as 27 metric tons (50,000lbs), the mystery is as great as the construction of the pyramids.

30″ high, 140 lbs (2 pieces)

Code: AKA

 

Akahanga No Hat, stained concrete Easter Island statue for outdoor garden or patio

Akahanga (No Hat)

Located over 2700 miles off the coast of Chile, the isolated Easter Island boasts the world’s largest collection of megaliths.  These giant statues range in height from 10 – 33 feet and were constructed over 18 centuries ago.  All of the statues face westward and their significance is still a subject of debate.  Some say they represent lost kings, and that one was constructed for every king.  Others say they are to scare away invaders.  The real mystery is how they were transported to where they now stand.  Weighing as much as 27 metric tons (50,000lbs), the mystery is as great as the construction of the pyramids.

26″ high, 95 lbs

Code: AKANH

 

American Colonial Pedestal Tall in Ancient Stone

American Colonial Pedestal – Short

In this series of benches, birdbaths, fountains, planters, pedestals and lamp, seasoned designer & sculptor Klaus Kinast has attempted to capture the design essence of the American Colonial period. This term generally refers to that period of U.S. history from the time of European settlement (the late 16th c.) up to independence in 1776, with particular emphasis on the Thirteen Colonies of Britain. The design of this period was predominately that of the European states from where the settlers came from, but was influenced by the simpler lives that these people lived. Gone was the heavy emphasis on ostentatious decoration, instead being replaced by a simpler, less cluttered and easier style. Great use was made of local woods in furniture design and quilting and fabric became important decoration.  Motifs were generally simple in the form of natural flowers & fruit. As the style developed, higher grade furniture was introduced along with decorative accessories and fabrics.

25″ high, 140 lbs (2 pieces)

Code: ACC-PEDS

 

American Colonial Pedestal Tall in Ancient Stone

American Colonial Pedestal – Tall

In this series of benches, birdbaths, fountains, planters, pedestals and lamp, seasoned designer & sculptor Klaus Kinast has attempted to capture the design essence of the American Colonial period. This term generally refers to that period of U.S. history from the time of European settlement (the late 16th c.) up to independence in 1776, with particular emphasis on the Thirteen Colonies of Britain. The design of this period was predominately that of the European states from where the settlers came from, but was influenced by the simpler lives that these people lived. Gone was the heavy emphasis on ostentatious decoration, instead being replaced by a simpler, less cluttered and easier style. Great use was made of local woods in furniture design and quilting and fabric became important decoration.  Motifs were generally simple in the form of natural flowers & fruit. As the style developed, higher grade furniture was introduced along with decorative accessories and fabrics.

25″ high, 140 lbs (2 pieces)

Code: ACC-PEDT

 

Bather in Ancient Stone (Shown on Plynth)

Bather

The Bather by Allegrain (1710-1795)

The original Bather by Allegrain was sculpted in1767 for Mme. Du Barry and placed  in the gardens of Louvecienne. Mme Du Barry, a women of extraordinary beauty was Louis XV’s mistress and lover. The king of France built palaces for her and encouraged her to patronize the arts. Allegrain’s statue was influenced by Venus, the goddess of love, although her delicate features and slender waist and wrist are characteristic of eighteenth century French femininity

35″ high, 105 lbs

Code: BHR

Bella Donna in Western Slate

Bella Donna

Of French origin, “Belladonna” has been fashioned in an Art Nouveau style. Art Nouveau, is a phrase used to describe a European art movement of the last two decades of the 1800s and the first decade of the 1900s. The term Art Nouveau is derived from Maison de l’Art Nouveau, a Paris shop opened in 1896 by the dealer Siegfried Bing. It found expression in a wide range of art forms—architecture, interior design, furniture, posters, glass, pottery, textiles, and book illustration—and was characterized by its devotion to curving and undulating lines, often referred to as whiplash lines. “Belladonna” is sure to delight any home or garden.

33″ high, 70 lbs

Code: BELL

 

Benedict Gargoyle medieval concrete statue for garden patio

Benedict Gargoyle

On a pilgrimage to Paris, Benedict fell in love with a young woman. Whilst very beautiful on the outside, she was cold and cruel on the inside. She quickly grew bored with Benedict’s attentions and devised a scheme to rid herself of him. One day she demanded that he perform three tasks to prove his love for her: If successful, she would agree to be married. First, she wanted him to fly her up to the castle tower.  Benedict went to the sorcerer and asked for a potion to make him grow wings and then, as requested, flew her to the top of the tower. The young woman admired the gargoyles surrounding the tower and wished that Benedict would look as handsome as they. Again, blinded by his love, Benedict took a potion and was transformed into a horned gargoyle. For his final task, she demanded that he sit not eating, sleeping or speaking until her return and then they would be wed. The wicked woman never returned and after many long years, Benedict turned to stone. Today he watches over the young lovers of Paris whilst awaiting the return of his love.

25″ high, 220 lbs

Code: BEN

 

Brahma in Ancient Stone (Shown on the ORISE and ABP)

Brahma

Hinduism is the world’s oldest religion, having its origins in India more than 5000 years ago. Hindus believe in ‘Samsara’ or the cycle of birth, death and rebirth. The gods Brahma (the Creator), shown here, Vishnu (the Provider) and Shiva (the Destroyer) represent this belief. Liberation from ‘Samsara’ can only be found through the pursuit of the ultimate goal in life – ‘Moksha’. This spiritual state is achieved by performing good deeds and being devoted to God. Hindu theology views God as being one but that this one can have many manifestations of forms.

37″ high, 270 lbs

Code: BRAM

 

Ealhelm Gargoyle medieval concrete statue for garden gatepost

Ealhelm Gargoyle

After a terrible argument with his girlfriend, Ealhelm perched himself upon the side of a building cornice to contemplate his next move. So engrossed in thought was he that he completely lost track of time and unfortunately the morning light turned him to stone. As time passed, the building was torn down. A mason working on the demolition chanced upon Ealhelm and was taken by his forlorn, lifelike expression. The mason saved the poor fellow from certain destruction and vowed never to let his new friend spend his days alone. Ealhelm is an old Anglo-Saxon name meaning ‘protector of temples’.

27″ high, 120 lbs

Code: EAL

 

Egyptin Girl in Ancient Stone

Egyptian Girl

Following the discovery of King Tutankhamun’s tomb by Howard Carter in 1922, the western world was obsessed with anything Egyptian. The treasure recovered was of such great quality and design, that dress, jewelry, architecture and many other mediums were influenced with ancient Egyptian motifs such as the scarab beetle or lotus flower. The “Art Deco” movement (commencing in the mid 1920’s), has many of it’s roots firmly planted in the art of ancient Egypt. In this piece we clearly see Egypt’s influence in the small table that the girl is leaning upon. She is also dressed in ‘roaring 20’s’ revealing fashion.

30″ high, 85 lbs

Code: EGGI

 

Large Giddian Gargoyle medieval concrete statue for garden

Giant Giddian Gargoyle

Travis Bond has sculpted Giddian in the same style as the medieval European stonemason’s work, emphasizing gargoyles primary job of scaring away evil and easing the transition from paganism to Christianity. Giddian is not a replica, but rather an original design. Had Travis been sculpting in the thirteenth century, his work would undoubtedly be found on some of the finer cathedrals and chapels.

26″ high, 220 lbs

Code: LGGID

 

Giant Inuksuk in Western Slate

Giant Inuksuk

Inuksuk

(ee-nook-shook)

For thousands of years the Inuit in Canada’s Arctic have created large stone markers called Inuksuk which means acting in the capacity of a human. They act as a guide for travellers, showing direction, warning of danger and marking places of significance (food, etc.).

36″ high, 210 lbs

Code: INU36

 

Gaint Mongolian Buddha in Ancient Stone

Giant Mongolian Buddha

This Buddha sculpture is a reproduction of the statue from the Heicheng archaeological site in Inner Mongolia. This relic dates back to the Xia State (1032-1226). Images of the Buddha were venerated as reminders of the life and virtues of the great teacher, and all representations have certain physical signs of perfection; elongated ears, and a top knot of hair which covers the second brain grown by the Buddha to contain his enlightenment. The hands are in the traditional meditation position.

34″ high, 210 lbs

Code: MONG

Large Ramsis Gargoyle medieval concrete statue for ancient garden

Giant Ramsis Gargoyle

One upon a time, after the fall of Rome in a far away land, there lived three gargoyles: Giddian, Cadred & Ramsis. Now you know that at night when we are asleep, gargoyles come to life. One of the favorite pastimes of Giddian, Cadred & Ramsis was to mock their friends the three monkeys; See No Evil, Hear No Evil & Speak No Evil. Little did Giddian know that half a world away; his namesake had put pen to paper to write the bible. At that very instant all three gargoyles were frozen forever in their mocking poses. Together, the three gargoyles protect the harmony of your garden.

30″ high, 220 lbs

Code: LGRAMS

 

Giant Swimming Koi concrete, garden fish Japanese statue

Giant Swimming Koi

The Giant Swimming Koi is manufactured using our ‘lay-up’ technique, which allows us to produce a large impressive garden piece that is not unmanageable in mass. Can be left outside year-round. Koi are members of the carp family of fish. Carp have long been kept and bred as pets in many civilizations. The ancient Romans kept them in ponds and fountains and bred the ancestors of today’s common Goldfish. In China, they are recognized as good luck symbols. The colorful Koi carp available today are the result of a strain first bred 160 years ago in Japan from a naturally occurring mutation. The word Koi actually translates to “carp” in Japanese.

53″ wide, 17″ high, 120lbs

Code: GSKOI

Giant Temple Buddha large concrete statue garden

Giant Temple Buddha

The Giant Temple Buddha is manufactured using our ‘lay-up’ technique, which allows us to produce a large impressive garden piece that is not unmanageable in mass. Can be left outside year-round.

48″ high, 180lbs

Code: TBUD

Hathi Pedestal in Western Slate

Hathi – Elephant Pedestal

Inspired by the dream-like sculpture and paintings of surrealist Salvador Dali, master sculptor Klaus Kinast has designed a truly unique piece.  The word Hathi is derived from the Hindi word for elephant and was used by Rudyard Kipling to name a fictional bull elephant character in his famous Jungle Book novels. Hathi can be used as a pedestal/plant stand or a birdbath with the addition of a matching bowl.

29″ high, 100 lbs

Code: HAT-P

 

Head of Buddha in Western Slate

Head of Buddha

Buddha (563?- 483?BC), Indian philosopher and the founder of Buddhism, born in Kapilavastu, India, just inside present-day Nepal. His name Gautama Buddha is a combination of the family name Gautama and the appellation Buddha, meaning “Enlightened One.”  One day in 533, according to tradition, he encountered an aged man, a sick man, and a corpse, and he suddenly realized that suffering is the common lot of humankind. He then came upon a mendicant monk, calm and serene, whereupon he determined to adopt his way of life and forsake family, wealth, and power in the quest for truth. Accompanied by disciples, Buddha traveled through the valley of the Ganges River, teaching his doctrines, gathering followers, and establishing monastic communities that admitted anyone regardless of caste. Buddha’s teachings have influenced the lives of millions of people for nearly 2500 years.

24″ high, 100 lbs

Code: HEDB

Head of Shiva in York Stone

Head of Shiva

Hinduism is the world’s oldest religion, having its origins in India more than 5000 years ago. Hindus believe in ‘Samsara’ or the cycle of birth, death and rebirth. The gods Brahma (the Creator), Vishnu (the Provider) and Shiva (the Destroyer), shown here represent this belief. Liberation from ‘Samsara’ can only be found through the pursuit of the ultimate goal in life – ‘Moksha’. This spiritual state is achieved by performing good deeds and being devoted to God. Hindu theology views God as being one but that this one can have many manifestations of forms.

25″ high, 100 lbs

Code: SHIV