Showing 145–168 of 309 results

Japanese Lamp, stained concrete lantern for outdoor garden or patio

Japanese Lamp (Light Not Included)

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony and various forms of lantern evolved.

w14” x d14” x h36”  95 lb, 3 pieces

Shown in Ancient Stone

*Lighting not included, will accommodate wiring

Code: JLAMP

 

Japanese Lantern Kosai, stained concrete lamp for outdoor garden or patio

Japanese Lantern – Kosai

JAPANESE LANTERN; YUKIMA-GATA

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Yukima-gata (snow-viewing lanterns)

Yukima-gata are characterized by their low posture and open legged design. They are the most common type of lantern and are often found near water. They derive their name from the way that snow delicately gathers on their roofs. In this series:

Mashikaku (square) yukima-gata, Kosai (small) yukima-gata, Kukei (rectangle) yukima-gata

w13” x d13” x h16”  45 lb, 3 pieces

Shown in Ancient Stone

Code: JPLK

 

Japanese Lantern Kukei, stained concrete lamp for outdoor garden or patio

Japanese Lantern – Kukei

JAPANESE LANTERN; YUKIMA-GATA

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Yukima-gata (snow-viewing lanterns)

Yukima-gata are characterized by their low posture and open legged design. They are the most common type of lantern and are often found near water. They derive their name from the way that snow delicately gathers on their roofs. In this series:

Mashikaku (square) yukima-gata, Kosai (small) yukima-gata, Kukei (rectangle) yukima-gata

w10” x d8” x h22”  80 lb, 3 pieces 

Shown in Western Slate

Code: JPLKK

 

Japanese Lantern Mashikaku, stained concrete lamp for outdoor garden or patio

Japanese Lantern – Mashikaku

JAPANESE LANTERN; YUKIMA-GATA

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Yukima-gata (snow-viewing lanterns)

Yukima-gata are characterized by their low posture and open legged design. They are the most common type of lantern and are often found near water. They derive their name from the way that snow delicately gathers on their roofs. In this series:

Mashikaku (square) yukima-gata, Kosai (small) yukima-gata, Kukei (rectangle) yukima-gata

w16” x d12” x h19”  80 lb, 3 pieces  

Shown in Ancient Stone

Code: JPLM

 

Japanese Lantern Saiseki, stained concrete lamp for outdoor garden or patio

Japanese Lantern – Saiseki

JAPANESE LANTERN; IKEKOMI-GATA

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Ikekomi-gata (buried lanterns)

Ikekomi-gata lack a pedestal base and are therefore held steady by being buried in the ground. They are found throughout the tea garden, particularly close to a special hand-washing bowl, known as a tsukubai. In this series:Yojiru (twist) ikekomi-gata, Saiseki (stone) ikekomi-gata

w8” x d6” x h34”  80 lb, 3 pieces 

Shown in Ancient Stone

Code: JPLS

 

Japanese Lantern Yojiru, stained concrete lamp for outdoor garden or patio

Japanese Lantern – Yojiru

JAPANESE LANTERN; IKEKOMI-GATA

Stone lanterns were developed in 16th century Japan as a method of lighting garden paths leading to tearooms. Traditional tea ceremonies were often held in the evening. Guests would be expected to attain a certain level of mental refinement before reaching the tearooms, aided by strolling through a peaceful inner garden. Every element of the tea ceremony was designed to discourage distraction and promote inner harmony. Various forms of lantern evolved: Ikekomi-gata (buried lanterns)

Ikekomi-gata lack a pedestal base and are therefore held steady by being buried in the ground. They are found throughout the tea garden, particularly close to a special hand-washing bowl, known as a tsukubai. In this series:Yojiru (twist) ikekomi-gata, Saiseki (stone) ikekomi-gata

w8” x d8” x h33”  80 lb, 3 pieces  

Shown in Ancient Stone

Code: JPLY

 

Japanese Table garden

Japanese Table

w26” x d13.5” x h16.5” 185 lb, 2 pieces

Shown in Basalt Grey

Code: JTABLE

Jizo Bosatsu Child - The Peacemaker concrete Buddha garden ornament, statue

Jizo Bosatsu Child – The Peacemaker

Jizo Bosatsu Child – The Peacemaker

In Japan, among the most commonplace and much loved icons in Buddhist tradition is Jizō, or Ojizō-sama as he is more respectfully known.

Jizō is usually pictured as a small stone Buddhist monk statue with child-like features and traditionally carrying a staff and jewels. He is revered as the protector of children and travelers.

Jizō statues can often be found dressed in colorful bibs and clothing (usually red), a practice dating back centuries and thought to help to bring fertility, to protect children and to grant longevity.

Pictured here is the Peacemaker, but there is also the Protector and Preacher in the series.

w6.5” x d6” x h11” 15 lb

Shown in York Stone

Code: JZ-PEA

Jizo Bosatsu Child - The Preacher concrete Buddha garden ornament, statue

Jizo Bosatsu Child – The Preacher

Jizo Bosatsu Child – The Preacher

In Japan, among the most commonplace and much loved icons in Buddhist tradition is Jizō, or Ojizō-sama as he is more respectfully known.

Jizō is usually pictured as a small stone Buddhist monk statue with child-like features and traditionally carrying a staff and jewels. He is revered as the protector of children and travelers.

Jizō statues can often be found dressed in colorful bibs and clothing (usually red), a practice dating back centuries and thought to help to bring fertility, to protect children and to grant longevity.

Pictured here is the Preacher, but there is also the Protector and Peacemaker in the series.

w6” x d6” x h12” 20 lb

Shown in Ancient Stone 

Code: JZ-PRE

Jizo Bosatsu Child - The Protector, concrete Buddha garden ornament, statue

Jizo Bosatsu Child – The Protector

Jizo Bosatsu Child – The Protector

In Japan, among the most commonplace and much loved icons in Buddhist tradition is Jizō, or Ojizō-sama as he is more respectfully known.

Jizō is usually pictured as a small stone Buddhist monk statue with child-like features and traditionally carrying a staff and jewels. He is revered as the protector of children and travelers.

Jizō statues can often be found dressed in colorful bibs and clothing (usually red), a practice dating back centuries and thought to help to bring fertility, to protect children and to grant longevity.

Pictured here is the Protector , but there is also the Preacher and Peacemaker in the series

w6” x d5.5” x h11” 17 lb

Shown in Western Slate

 

Code: JZ-PRO

Koi Bowl, stained concrete bird bath for outdoor garden or patio

Koi Bowl

The Koi is a member of the carp family of fish. Carp have long been kept and bred as pets in many civilizations. The ancient Romans kept them in ponds and fountains and bred the ancestors of today’s common Goldfish. In China, they are recognized as good luck symbols. The colorful Koi carp available today are the result of a strain first bred 160 years ago in Japan from a naturally occurring mutation. The word Koi actually translates to “carp” in Japanese. Inspired by Japanese tsukubai (a hand-washing bowl used in tea ceremonies), this Koi bowl will allow you to keep Koi, without having to worry about pesky predators.

w13” x d13” x h6” 40 lb 

Shown in Ancient Stone 

Code: KOI

 

La – Lune The Moon (12″)

La Lune the Moon is Jeff William’s interpretation of the classical figurative moon. La Lune’s dreamy face is backdropped with stars and clouds which seem to capture the mystery and magic of the night.

1”x 12” diameter  5 lb  

Shown in Ancient Stone

Code: SMO

La- Lune moon wall plaque

La – Lune The Moon (22″)

La Lune the Moon is Jeff William’s interpretation of the classical figurative moon. La Lune’s dreamy face is backdropped with stars and clouds which seem to capture the mystery and magic of the night.

1”x 22” diameter   20 lb 

Shown left in Ancient Stone

Code: MOO

Large Buddha

Buddha (563?- 483?BC), Indian philosopher and the founder of Buddhism, born in Kapilavastu, India, just inside present-day Nepal. His name Gautama Buddha is a combination of the family name Gautama and the appellation Buddha, meaning “Enlightened One.”  One day in 533, according to tradition, he encountered an aged man, a sick man, and a corpse, and he suddenly realized that suffering is the common lot of humankind. He then came upon a mendicant monk, calm and serene, whereupon he determined to adopt his way of life and forsake family, wealth, and power in the quest for truth. Accompanied by disciples, Buddha traveled through the valley of the Ganges River, teaching his doctrines, gathering followers, and establishing monastic communities that admitted anyone regardless of caste. Buddha’s teachings have influenced the lives of millions of people for nearly 2500 years.

w12” x d11” x h16” 70 lb

Shown in Western Slate

Code: BUD

 

Large Griffin Gargoyle medieval concrete statue for garden

Large Griffin

A griffin is a mythical monster with the head and wings of an eagle and the body and tail of a lion. From the Latin gryphus, griffins were revered in medieval times and animated in sculpture found upon churches and cathedrals throughout Europe. The strength and grace of a lion and the alert panoramic sight of an eagle characterise the griffin’s appeal.

w9” x d16” x h29”  240 lb

Shown in Western Slate

Code: GRIF

 

Lawn Shark, humorous stained concrete ornament for outdoor garden or patio

Lawn Shark

10″ high, 30lbs (3 pieces)

Code:LSHARK

 

Treeman, Polynesian Tiki & Leaf Maiden Mask Pot Holders

Leaf Maiden Mask – Pot Holder

Comes with fabric planter attached for holding pots.

w11” x d9” x h30”   95 lb

Shown right in York Stone

Code: LMM-L-SP

Leonard & Theodore garden turtle ornaments

Leonard

w14” x d11” x h11”   60 lb

Shown  left in York Stone

Code: LEO

Live Edge Bench – Driftwood Bases

Yes it is concrete. This magnificent Live edge wood bench will add class and a rustic outdoors touch to your garden or patio seating areas.

w47” x d16” x h18” 180 lb, 3 pieces

Shown in Ancient Stone

Code: LEDGE-DR

Maternal Dragon

The dragon, a fabulous monster common to many mythologies, was usually conceived as a huge, bat-winged, fire-breathing creature with a barbed tail. The word dragon is derived from the Greek drakon, which was used originally for any large serpent. With the advent of Christianity, dragons came to be symbolic of sin and paganism and the slaying of a dragon was the crowning achievement of the heroes of the ancients. However, our beautifully detailed sculpture by Travis Bond remains a beneficent creature, capturing the bond between mother and child, and eschews the traditional view of the dragon as an agent of evil.

w12” x d15” x h16” 70 lb 

Shown in Western Slate

Code: MAT